$4.5-billion Louisiana hydrogen plant to create thousands of construction jobs

By Jenny LescohierOctober 18, 2021

Industrial gas supplier Air Products has announced it will build the power plant to make “blue hydrogen"

Thousands of construction jobs will be created from the construction of a $4.5-billion clean energy facility near Baton Rouge, LA. 

The Associated Press reported that industrial gas supplier Air Products has announced it will build the power plant to make “blue hydrogen,” which uses natural gas to produce an alternative fuel with the carbon dioxide emissions captured and stored underground. The company said the facility will create 170 permanent jobs with a total annual payroll of $15.9 million, plus thousands of construction jobs to build the site over three years.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has said the plant will help the state’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions in the heart of the petrochemical corridor.

The facility is expected to be up and running in 2026 and will be the largest of its kind, according to Air Products President and CEO Seifi Ghasemi.

“Nothing will come close to it,” Ghasemi said at an announcement event with Edwards, local officials and business leaders. “So clearly, Louisiana will be the world leader in sequestering carbon dioxide, which is the key to climate change.”

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