Bobcat’s all-electric T7X available in rental fleets this year

By Jenny LescohierJanuary 12, 2022

Joel Honeyman, vice president of global innovation, Doosan Bobcat North America

Now that Bobcat has introduced the world’s first all-electric compact track loader, equipment owners want to know the details. While quite a bit remains under wraps, we can tell you a bit more about the T7X.

To start with, this is no theoretical prototype. Machines are expected to arrive in rental yards yet this year through Doosan Bobcat’s recently announced partnership with Sunbelt Rentals.

About the T7X

The recipient of this year’s CES Innovation Award, the 12,187-lb T7X has a rated operating capacity of 3030-lbs at 35% of its 8,571-lb tipping load. 

Powered completely by a 62-kilowatt lithium-ion battery, the T7X can provide four to six hours of continuous operation. Bobcat said that during typical, intermittent use on the job site, it could run for an eight-hour shift, depending on the application. 

There are work modes to tailor T7X operation to the needs of the job. 

“If an operator is focused on preserving battery life, that’s where eco mode comes in,” explained Joel Honeyman, vice president of global innovation, Doosan Bobcat North America. “The advance mode is essentially very similar to our current T76 performance. Beast mode provides the ability for short bursts of full instantaneous torque to the drive system to really produce power when it’s needed.”

Unlike traditional compact loaders, the T7X doesn’t rely on a hydraulic system to transfer power to the machine’s work group. Instead, it features an electrical drive system consisting of electric motors and ball screw actuators. Together, the battery plant and electrical powertrain generate instantaneous torque that’s as much as three times greater than traditional loaders.

“The platform of the T7X offers another significant advantage to owners and operators – the reduction of nearly 50% in components, all of which are designed for smarter, simpler use,” said Honeyman. “In addition, this platform represents a significant change in overall machine maintenance, including the removal of fluid changes and machine failures related to the engine and hydraulic power trains. This eliminates those traditional repair costs.”

The Bobcat T7X is built with about half the parts and components required for a traditional, diesel-engine loader, driving down maintenance and overall

The Bobcat T7X is built with about half the parts and components required for a traditional, diesel-engine loader

ownership costs. It takes just one quart of eco-friendly coolant compared to nearly 60 gallons of fluids required in its diesel-and hydraulic-powered counterpart.

With fewer parts, components and fluid, Bobcat said regular maintenance and repair costs are significantly reduced as well as work time lost to maintenance and repairs. Fluid leaks, which can contaminate soil and groundwater and stain finished surfaces, are eliminated.

Coming soon

Bobcat has expressed a commitment to equipment electrification, as evidenced by its recent T7X introduction. But there’s more to come.

“We will continue to refine our other electric platforms,” Honeyman said. “For example, we are starting to introduce battery-electric excavator models in 2022 in North America. In addition, a big priority will continue to be gauging the success of the T7X over the near term.”

Honeyman added, “Innovation has always been a part of the Bobcat legacy, and what we have been doing in the technology space for the past several years has culminated in where we are today. It’s also the platform for where we will go in the future. This includes electrification, autonomy and connectivity.”

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