Study: Augmented reality reduces costs, attracts workers

By Andy BrownMay 08, 2022

How can you save on costs while attracting young people to work at your construction company? Augmented reality might be the answer.

According to a report from GlobalData, giving construction workers access to technology such as augmented reality (AR) will not only combat soaring resource costs, but help attract young people to construction roles.

The report reveals that around 55% of construction industry executives surveyed by GlobalData in late 2021 intend to invest in AR within the next two years but one third have no plans to buy into the technology.

GlobalData expects the sector to grow from $9 billion in 2021 to $152 billion by 2030. Not only does this show the technology’s popularity as a product, but also its resourcefulness. Looking at the construction industry specifically, GlobalData’s report has identified several emerging AR use cases with huge potential.

Robert Penman, analyst for the thematic research team at GlobalData, comments, “AR will be particularly useful during a project’s construction stage due to the sheer number of operatives that could use these devices. AR enables building models to be positioned on site through headsets or smart glasses, so they can be compared to the construction site. A user will easily notice errors before further work occurs, avoiding unnecessary rework and using additional expensive materials.

“The more complex mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) elements a project requires, the more the project will gain from AR,” Penman says.

MORE ARTICLES FROM CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 NEWS
Wacker Neuson to build mini excavators for Deere
On the heels of ending its joint venture with Hitachi, Deere has entered a new partnership with Wacker Neuson to produce machines in the zero to 9-tonne class for North America
Caterpillar to move global headquarters to Irving, Texas
Talent attraction was cited as one reason for the move, which marks the second time the equipment manufacturer has relocated in less than five years
What’s next: Volvo CE tests world’s first hydrogen-powered hauler
A prototype of the Volvo HX04 shows the potential that hydrogen and fuel cells bring to future equipment, but commercialization is likely still five or more years away