Biggest articulated haul truck now has rear-eject capability

By Jenny LescohierMay 17, 2022

The Volvo A60H features a body volume of 43.9 cubic yards with a 2:1 heap ratio, making these rear ejects 50% larger than the most common rear eject bodies available

The biggest articulated haul truck on the market just got rear-eject capability, thanks to off-highway truck customizer Philippi-Hagenbuch.

Philippi-Hagenbuch Inc. has expanded its rear-eject engineering capabilities to include the largest articulated haul truck on the market, the Volvo A60H. These trucks feature a body volume of 43.9 cubic yards with a 2:1 heap ratio, making these rear ejects 50% larger than the most common rear eject bodies available, the company said.

In partnership with G.W. Van Keppel, a dealership based in Kansas City, MO, Philippi-Hagenbuch shipped its first two rear-eject bodies for Volvo A60H trucks to a mine in Oklahoma. Each of these rear ejects features an interior width of 156 inches and a loading height of 148 inches and is built exclusively out of high-strength, abrasion-resistant Hardox 450 steel for exceptional life and to handle the extremes they are put under within mining environments.

“Philippi-Hagenbuch is committed to detail in design, professionally engineering their products, understanding the applications and using only the best steel. This makes them a great partner to provide strong and durable haul truck solutions that help our customers maximize their efficiency,” said Taylor Killion, general sales manager, G.W. Van Keppel.

“We were confident in PHIL’s experience and ability to take on this project and produce a custom solution that would meet this client’s objectives.”

Philippi-Hagenbuch said it has custom-engineered hundreds of rear-eject bodies for a variety of makes and models of off-highway haul trucks to increase productivity, safety and stability for many operations. Their rear-eject bodies are designed to allow operators to effectively and safely discharge material without having to stop and raise the truck bed, even when the truck is out of position, driving up a hill or under overhead barriers with low clearance.

Operators control the ejector blade to push material out of the body while the tailgate mechanically lowers. Rear ejects effectively dump even the stickiest material, further improving hauling efficiency by reducing carryback.

“We have complete trust in our engineering and manufacturing capabilities, which gives us confidence to take on projects that other companies may shy away from,” says Josh Swank, Philippi-Hagenbuch vice president of sales and marketing. “In the past, we have engineered even larger rear-eject bodies and trailers, so we are no strangers to projects of this size.

“For this new entry to the haul truck market, we have created a new standardized solution for the Volvo A60H that can be easily implemented for other clients in varying industries,” Swank said.

Philippi-Hagenbuch recently updated its rear-eject technology to include a newly engineered single, three-stage, double-acting hydraulic cylinder that is robust enough to keep its rear ejects operating in extreme cold or in equatorial warm-weather locations. This cylinder was specifically designed for horizontal movement so it will not buckle or bind when it is fully extended while operating in a variety of dynamic environments.

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