Certified Equipment Support Specialist is proof of qualification

By Karen ScallyMarch 17, 2021

While working as a sales rep at his previous employer, Rickey Bailey noticed that most of his fleet manager customers had something in common. 

They all had their Certfied Equipment Manager (CEM) through the Association of Equipment Management Professionals (AEMP).

Though Bailey had 20 years of experience in the industry, he learned he could grasp the fleet manager’s world even better through the Certified Equipment Support Professional (CESP) designation, which is designed for vendor representatives by building on the CEM objectives.

“I just felt like it was the right thing to do to try to understand where they spent their time, other than just how much something costs,” Bailey says. “It’s helpful to know what the pressure points are and what exactly it is they’re trying to accomplish.”

Even with all his time spent working with fleet managers on their equipment needs, he says getting his CESP provided insights to responsibilities he didn’t realize they had.

“It made me appreciate how detailed these guys have to get into the financials, environmental concerns, and safety concerns,” he says.

The Certified Equipment Support Professional provides insights into fleet manager responsibilities that dealer and supplier representatives might not be aware of

Now as the vice president of the crane division for Kirby-Smith Machinery Inc., a dealer with 12 branches throughout Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Missouri, and Southern Illinois, Bailey says having his CESP helps demonstrate his qualifications to his customers who have their CEMs. He says they know the kind of work he has put in to comprehend their needs and challenges.

“They understand what you’ve done and what you’ve been through from a certification standpoint, and it’s appreciated and recognized,” Bailey says.

Bailey says the CESP allows dealer and supplier representatives to distinguish themselves by showing how much they care about their customers’ success — not just their own.

“Participating in the CESP furthers support professionals’ knowledge and understanding of what it is your customers are trying to accomplish, especially if new to the industry,” he says. “As soon as you meet the eligibility requirements, I would say it’s a good thing for manufacturers and distributors alike. And it’s just a great way to get involved in the industry.”

Karen Scally is a journalist who has covered the construction industry for over a decade and a current contributor to the blog at Gearflow.com, which is an online marketplace for construction parts, tools, and equipment. This article was adapted from its original version, “How to Prepare Now for Future of Electric Construction Equipment,” on the Gearflow.com blog.

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