Concrete that powers equipment? Yes, really

By Catrin JonesJanuary 17, 2022

Concrete is one of the most used materials in the world and work is underway to enable it to recharge electric-powered vehicles and equipment

The concept of fully electric construction equipment can be a lot for some to comprehend, and now it looks like we might see magnetized concrete that can charge it up wirelessly. 

Switzwerland-based global builder Holcim is partnering with the German startup Magment to improve its magnetizable concrete technology for road surfaces to enable electric vehicles to recharge while in motion.

Known as ‘inductive charging’ this concrete-based solution reduces the need for charging stations, one of the barriers to electric equipment. It is made possible by a unique concrete with high magnetic permeability jointly developed by Holcim and Magment’s research and development teams.

The technology is currently being tested by researchers at Purdue University with highway trials planned. Other applications under development include the electrification of industrial floors to recharge robots and forklifts as they work.

Edelio Bermejo, head of Holcim’s Global Innovation Centre, said, “We are innovating to put concrete at the center of our world’s transition to net-zero. With Magment, we are excited to be developing concrete solutions to accelerate electric mobility. Partnering with start-ups all over the world we are constantly pushing the boundaries of innovation to lead the way in sustainability.”

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