Construction unemployment rises to 10%

By Andy BrownMarch 11, 2021

Construction unemployment rose to 10% in February 2021

Almost 10% of construction workers in the U.S. are unemployed amid severe winter weather and continuing weakness in new nonresidential projects, according to an analysis of government data by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC).

The AGC has reported construction employment declined by 61,000 from January to February, the first overall decline since April 2020. Employment totalled 7,340,000, a decrease of 4% from the most recent peak in February 2020.

“The steep decline in construction employment in February continues a downward trend in nonresidential activity that began before the disruptions caused by last month’s freezes and power losses,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. 

“Despite recovery in some parts of the economy, private nonresidential construction is still experiencing many cancelled and postponed projects and few new starts.”

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg recently indicated that now was a ‘once in a lifetime’ moment for the country to invest in infrastructure.

“Washington officials can’t change the weather, but they can help boost demand for infrastructure, address spiking steel and lumber prices and avoid anti-recovery measures like the PRO Act,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, CEO of AGC.

MORE ARTICLES FROM CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 NEWS
Doosan to show off new brand at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2023
This leading OEM will tell the story of its new brand while displaying its two new dozers and first 100-metric-ton crawler excavator, as well as new machines yet to be announced
Why are women in construction at a record high?
Females represent half of the population but still only 14% of the construction workforce, leaving plenty of hiring potential for innovative construction firms
Bechtel tapped to build largest private-sector investment ever in Ohio
Building a new Intel semiconductor factory near Columbus joins a surge in U.S. chip fabricating spurred by August’s CHIPS Act