Hitachi to pursue rental market in North America under Premium Rental brand

By Belinda SmartAugust 25, 2021

Hitachi will supply machines directly to its dealers in North America to create the Premium Rental service

Japanese manufacturer Hitachi Construction Machinery will pursue growth in the North American rental market under its own brand, following the ending of its joint venture with John Deere.

Hitachi said it will continue to expand the Arizona-based ACME wholesale rental business in which it first invested in 2018 and after February 2022 - when the JV with Deere ends - it will add dealer-rental operations under the ‘Premium Rental’ brand.

ACME is already operating a wholesale rental business in North America with Hitachi excavators. In the future, ACME will expand the wholesale rental business with both rental company customers and Hitachi dealers.

In addition, Hitachi will supply machines directly to its dealers in North America to create the Premium Rental service. These dealers will also offer used equipment through a ‘Premium Used’ business.

ACME recently sold its aerial platform rental business to United Rentals.

“Going forward, in addition to expanding ACME’s transactions with regional and national rental companies, we will expand Hitachi Construction Machinery’s unique rental business in cooperation with its dealer network,” according to a statement from Hitachi.

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