Mexico City metro line collapses onto road below, killing 24

By Andy BrownMay 05, 2021

(REUTERS/Carlos Jasso)

A metro overpass has collapsed in Mexico City onto a road, killing at least 24 people.

The accident happened near the Olivos station on line 12 in the southeast part of the city. The elevated section was 16 feet above the road and was supported by concrete pillars.

The line was inaugurated in 2012 – according to reports, there has previously been concerns raised about structural failures of the line. Elevated parts of the line, including the collapsed overpass, were closed for multiple repairs in 2014.

After a powerful 2017 earthquake, government data show there was also damage to the line’s support columns.

The line was built by a consortium including Carso, ICA and Alstom.

Fernando Espino, secretary-general of the union representing metro workers, said the incident was related to a construction problem.

“This is a structural failure... We don’t know if it’s related to the material with which this [section] was built. We need to see what happened,” he said, according to El Universal newspaper.

Mexico City’s metro system is one of the most used in the world – in North America, only New York’s subway carries more people every day.

Mexican authorities have promised a full investigation into the collapse, with President Andrés Manuel López Obrador saying that “nothing would be hidden.”

MORE ARTICLES FROM CONEXPO-CON/AGG 365 NEWS
Wacker Neuson to build mini excavators for Deere
On the heels of ending its joint venture with Hitachi, Deere has entered a new partnership with Wacker Neuson to produce machines in the zero to 9-tonne class for North America
Caterpillar to move global headquarters to Irving, Texas
Talent attraction was cited as one reason for the move, which marks the second time the equipment manufacturer has relocated in less than five years
What’s next: Volvo CE tests world’s first hydrogen-powered hauler
A prototype of the Volvo HX04 shows the potential that hydrogen and fuel cells bring to future equipment, but commercialization is likely still five or more years away